neonvincent: For posts about geekery and general fandom (Shadow Play Girl)
Bill Nye and Neil DeGrasse Tyson at the Emmy Awards

 

'Wild Yellowstone: The Frozen Frontier' -- last year's Emmy winner for Outstanding Cinematography: Documentary and Long Form

"The Yellowstone winters are unforgiving and the animals that call the park home have a variety of strategies they employ in order to survive" -- National Geographic Wild on YouTube.

Nature and science at the Primetime Emmy Awards
Three shows nominated for Primetime Emmy Awards examine nature, science, and scientists. "Planet Earth II" and "Genius" each earned ten nominations. "Bill Nye Saves The World" earned two.

Vox on 'Planet Earth II'
In three videos, Vox explains how the BBC makes Planet Earth look like a Hollywood movie, how wildlife films warp time, and how the BBC films the night side of Planet Earth.

More nature and science at the Primetime Emmy Awards
Five more shows about nature, science, and space earned one nomination each at the Primetime Emmy Awards: "Wild New Zealand," "Wild Scotland," and "Year Million" were each nominated for Outstanding Narrator, “StarTalk with Neil deGrasse Tyson” was nominated for Outstanding Informational Series or Special, and “Mission: ISS” was nominated for Outstanding Original Interactive Program, a new category.
neonvincent: For general posts about politics not covered by other icons (Uncle V wants you)



Happy 4th of July AKA American Independence Day! To celebrate, I'm sharing the following links to my 4th of July entries over at Crazy Eddie's Motie News. If nothing else, my readers can listen to patriotic music while drinking red, white, and blue cocktails.

Bald Eagle facts for 4th of July weekend from DNews
A drum corps 4th of July
A drum corps Stars and Stripes for the 4th of July
A drum corps 4th of July from the Troopers
Drink recipes for July 4th from Tipsy Bartender
Drinks for 4th of July from Tipsy Bartender
Drink to a drum corps 4th of July from The Cadets

I'll return to posting top posts and saved comments tomorrow or the day after, as I might post something fannish tomorrow instead. In the meantime, my American readers can enjoy the holiday.
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I had a second snow day today, which I didn't expect, but it was enough to make me tired of blogging about the storm and its aftereffects. Instead, I decided to post about the intersection between science and sports, climate, and the latest developments in Detroit.
That should get my desire for a change of pace out of my system, so I might write about the weather after midnight. If not, I have some more D&D war stories to share.
neonvincent: For general posts about politics not covered by other icons (Uncle V wants you)
Fat Cat goes Galt


I've been a regular commenter over at Kunstler's blog for years, but I haven't been much of a participant over at The Archdruid Report until the past few weeks. There were three reasons for this. First, John Greer he Archdruid wasn't giving me what I couldn't already get at Kunstler's blog or The Oil Drum. Second, his comments are heavily moderated, while Kunstler's are only weakly so. Third, while he posts Wednesday P.M., he's just not a predictable as Kunstler. The latter two meant that I couldn't lure readers from his blog the way I could Kunstler's. So, I read when I had the opportunity, but didn't comment.

This year, that all changed. First, Kunstler moved from Peak Oil to finance. Then, The Oil Drum closed down. Finally, The Archdruid moved to a topic that he is uniquely suited to address, the role of belief systems in societies and how resource depletion would affect both societies and their beliefs. It was enough that, after two years, I finally found something of Greer's that I could feature on my blog, the description of civil antireligions in The Fate of Civil Religion that I excerpted and commented on to compose The Archdruid on Objectivism as civil antireligion. Then, he wrote an essay that I actually had something to say in response to, An Old Kind of Science, which I turned into A conversation with The Archdruid for the Solstice. The next week, he engaged in A Christmas Speculation, in which he called the GOP a bunch of closet Satanists who were hiding their true beliefs behind their devotion to Ayn Rand. I commented on that and converted the result into A conversation with The Archdruid about Objectivism, Satanism, and the GOP. I despise Objectivism, and couldn't resist a comparison between it and an unpopular religion. After all, two years ago, I posted Objectivism and Scientology: a sublime to the ridiculous comparison.

So, Greer isn't directly good for driving traffic. He is good for inspiring my writing, which is proving to be good for bringing readers in. I posted a link to the most recent entry about the Archdruid to Kunstler's blog this morning. So far, I've pulled in 400+ page views to that post, moving it up to the second third most read entry this calendar year and the ninth most read in the history of the Crazy Eddie's Motie News. That only took 12 hours. I think I'll keep reading and responding to The Archdruid after all.
neonvincent: Detroit where the weak are killed and eaten T-shirt design (Detroit)
I completely missed reposting any of my posts from Crazy Eddie's Motie News for March on the Nablopomo theme of Whether. Bad dog, no biscuits. I'll get around to organizing and posting linkspams from last month eventually. In the meantime, I'll resume my regular weekly summaries of the Nablopomo posts for April. This month, the theme is poetry. Here's what I wrote on April Fools Day.


From Nablopomo on BlogHer:
So what is the NaBloPoMo theme of the month?
POEM

In honour of National Poetry Month in April, we've made the theme POEM -- which can go in a multitude of directions. First and foremost, you can try your hand at writing some poetry. We'll be presenting a few fixed forms as well as prompts for free forms. Make a personal goal to write a haiku-a-day, write an entire post in rhymed couplets, or argue the merits of Pinterest... in sestina form.

We'll be writing about our reactions to poems -- which poems have come up at important moments in your life? Which poems do you return to again and again? Which poems have changed your mood, given you comfort, or made you want to be a poet yourself?

We'll spend the month looking at reflections of poetry in nature and social situations. And we'll be featuring YOUR poetry weekly. So get your poem on.
When I first read the theme and description, I considered not participating, as I'm not big on poetry. I especially had a hard time squaring the theme with a blog about sustainability, science, and politics, although "poetry in nature" might work. Then I realized that there were some forms of poetry that I liked, limericks and song verses. Most limericks wouldn't be fit for a family blog, but I can always find a good song for my posts. So, I'm participating again this month.
The songs that I've featured so far are:
There will be more next week, as I already have another post up.

Happy reading and happy listening!
neonvincent: For posts about Twilight and trolling (Twilight Fandom wank trolls you)

The first full moon of 2012 will be tonight, the first of 13 full moons this year. Each of these moons has a name (and one of them has two names), as Space.com (via MSNBC) explains.*

How 2012's full moons got their strange names
Origins credited to Native Americans and early European settlers
By Joe Rao
updated 1/7/2012 3:07:59 PM ET
The start of 2012 brings with it a new year of skywatching, and lunar enthusiasts are gearing up for a stunning lineup of full moons. But, where does the tradition of full moon names come from?

Full moon names date back to Native Americans of a few hundred years ago, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. To keep track of the changing seasons, these tribes gave distinctive names to each recurring full moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred.

There were some variations in the moon names, but in general, the same ones were used throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England, continuing west to Lake Superior.

European settlers followed their own customs and created some of their own names. Here is a list of all of the full moon names, as well as the dates and times for 2012: (Unless otherwise noted, all times are given in Eastern Standard Time.)
Tonight's full moon is the Full Wolf Moon which will reach maximum on January 9th (technically tomorrow) at 2:30 a.m. EST. The association of wolf with a full moon has cross-cultural connotations, particularly with superstitions about what else happens involving wolves, people, and full moons. Everyone, enjoy the light show and sing along with Warren Zevon. A-hoo!



Now that the show is over, surf over to Crazy Eddie's Motie News for the rest of the full moon names, along with important astronomical events associated with some of them.

*This article is among those I excerpted for last night's Overnight News Digest: Science Saturday (100 Year Starship edition) on Daily Kos. The headline article of that diary entry is one that also deserves a "Beginnings" entry of its own, especially given the science fiction slant of this blog. Like Anonymous, expect it.
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sustainability_spheres

In the previous digest, I promised "global and national environmental issues, local (Michigan and Metro Detroit) sustainability issues, and Tea Party screw-ups." I'll do the first one, as I just posted an entry on that general topic.

Next Media Animation on the Keystone XL pipeline

Next Media Animation on Thanksgiving food inflation

Phil Plait on saving Earth from asteroids

Nebris and I have a conversation

A video gift from a student

Yes, I posted that one before. It's worth seeing again. Besides, I'm an environmentalist; I recycle.

The village of Wukan, China, in open revolt

The situation in Wukan escalates

More paranoia about Agenda 21

You'll see this one again, as it's about Tea Partiers screwing up.

Next Media Animation thinks low birth rates in the U.S. and China aren't all good

Next Media Animation on Canada leaving the Kyoto Protocol, plus a Rick Perry joke

With that last entry, the topics complete the circle, as the first and last are about Canadian tar sands.
neonvincent: For posts about geekery and general fandom (Shadow Play Girl)

Crazy Eddie the Motie wishes you a Merry Christmas, part 1

Funny and snarky videos from Next Media Animation.

Crazy Eddie the Motie wishes you a Merry Christmas, part 2

A Christmas light show set to music from a drum and bugle corps.

Crazy Eddie the Motie wishes you a Merry Christmas, part 3

Christmas-themed space and science stories.

Now time to play Star Wars: The Old Republic.  May the Force be with you!


neonvincent: For posts about geekery and general fandom (Shadow Play Girl)

Original here

PhysOrg: PHD Comics hits the big screen
by Deborah Braconnier
September 16, 2011
(PhysOrg.com) -- If you are a graduate student, you are more than likely aware of the popular Piled Higher and Deeper, or PHD, Comics created by Jorge Cham. These comics cover the everyday struggles that scientists face while in grad school in a humorous and accurate depiction.

For the last year, grad students around the world have found themselves missing their regular comics, it now appears that creator Jorge Cham had a very good reason for the comic going MIA. He has been working with a team of grad students from California Institute of Technology, or Caltech, to create a live-action film where the characters of his comic strip come alive.
More, including a trailer, at the link.

Crossposted to [community profile] scans_daily  and random_lounge on JournalFen.
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I have a really cool, if depressing, macro at We could have had the Moon, instead we get Afghanistan on Crazy Eddie's Motie News. Unfortunately, I can't seem to post it here because of what the browser says is "bad unicode." Let's see if this works.
neonvincent: For posts about geekery and general fandom (Shadow Play Girl)
Reuters: Space shuttle leaves Earth on final flight
By Irene Klotz
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida | Fri Jul 8, 2011 1:24pm EDT
Space shuttle Atlantis rocketed off its seaside launch pad on Friday, rising atop a tower of smoke and flames as it left Earth on the shuttle program's final flight.

About 1 million sightseers witnessed the smooth liftoff from Kennedy Space Center. They lined causeways and beaches around the central Florida site, angling for a last glimpse of the pioneering ship that has defined the U.S. space program for the past 30 years.

"Good luck to you and your crew on this final flight of this true American icon," shuttle launch director Mike Leinbach radioed to the crew minutes before takeoff.
...
"The shuttle is always going to be a reflection of what a great nation can do when it dares to be bold and commits to follow through," said Atlantis commander Chris Ferguson.
I would consider myself remiss if I didn't at least mention this story, which I plan on highlighting as the science story of the week over on Daily Kos tomorrow night. After all, this blog is about both collapse, including decline, a leading indicator of collapse, and how to prevent it, and I examine these topics from a science fiction angle. I think few themes more exemplify civilizational decline in science fiction more than withdrawing from space, and those that do generally include loss of ability to travel off the planet.

For the rest of this post, read it on Crazy Eddie's Motie News.
neonvincent: For posts about geekery and general fandom (Shadow Play Girl)

Solstices and Equinoxes


National Geographic: Summer Solstice 2011: Why It's the First Day of Summer
Why summer starts today, and why it's the longest day—but not the hottest.
Ker Than
for National Geographic News
Updated June 21, 2011
The first day of summer—heralded today by a manic bunny and bear in a Google doodle by artist Takashi Murakami—officially kicks off today at 1:16 p.m. ET, the beginning of the summer solstice and of the longest day of the year, at least in the Northern Hemisphere.
Just like my Rapture post, I felt I couldn't blog about the environment and not observe an environmentally significant event. The difference is that this one is real.

Crossposted to Crazy Eddie's Motie News.
neonvincent: For posts about geekery and general fandom (Shadow Play Girl)
June2011NaBloPoMoSmallBadge


Renowned paleontologist Jack Horner has spent his career trying to reconstruct a dinosaur. He's found fossils with extraordinarily well-preserved blood vessels and soft tissues, but never intact DNA. So, in a new approach, he's taking living descendants of the dinosaur (chickens) and genetically engineering them to reactivate ancestral traits — including teeth, tails, and even hands — to make a "Chickenosaurus".
I'm a paleontologist by training, so of course I'm a fan of Jack Horner. If nothing else, his discoveries have made dinosaurs more interesting.
neonvincent: Detroit where the weak are killed and eaten T-shirt design (Detroit)

Sustainability news from Michigan's Research Universities for the week ending June 4, 2011

Sustainability news from midwestern Research Universities for the week ending June 4, 2011

Sustainability News for the week ending June 4, 2011: National commercial sources

Wow, three posts in one day--looks like I'm not so burned out any more. I guess taking a couple days off helped!

Also, I posted about Michigan politics.

Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner--oh the possibilities!

As you can see, that one pressed my ambition button. I'll re-write that one and post it here on Dreamwith and LJ, as well as on Michigan Liberal and Daily Kos.

Finally, I promoted my most recent post on Kunstler's blog.

That's enough for this morning. Time to go back to bed!

neonvincent: For posts about geekery and general fandom (Shadow Play Girl)

June2011NaBloPoMoSmallBadge



No, I'm not a "My Little Pony" fan. I am a fan of fun science, and this presentation certainly qualifies.
neonvincent: Detroit where the weak are killed and eaten T-shirt design (Default)

Below originally posted to Overnight News Digest: Science Saturday (Yuri's Night 2011 edition)

Welcome to Science Saturday, where the Overnight News Digest crew informs and entertains you with this week's news about science, space, and the environment.

This week's featured story comes from the Yuri's Night website.

Human Spaceflight became a reality 50 years ago with the launch of a bell-shaped capsule called “Vostok 1” on April 12th, 1961. The capsule was carrying Soviet Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, who took his place in history as the first human to leave the bounds of Earth and enter outer space.

Exactly 20 years later, the United States embarked on a new era in spaceflight with the inaugural launch of a new type of spaceship — the Space Shuttle (April 12th, 1981). Designed to carry a larger crew and large volumes of cargo to orbit, the Space Shuttles became synonymous with human spaceflight for an entirely new generation of young people.

When the next 20-year point arrived, that generation (often called “Gen X”) laid a new space milestone by connecting thousands of people around the world to celebrate and honor the past, while building a stairway to the future. That event was Yuri’s Night, and it continues to bring the excitement, passion and promise of space travel closer to people of all ages, nationalities and backgrounds.
This is the fourth Yuri's Night I've covered for Overnight News Digest. Time flies.

Two videos from NASA Television on YouTube about the event behind the cut. )

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